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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
would be seeing wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting finishes to a presidential election in the television age. we are not going to see as much of that, certainly through the weekend. which means whichever candidate was going to befit more fr national coverage is going to lose paired to what it would have been like. >> rose: we conclude this evening, focusing on politics with nate silver, founder of "the new york times" blog 538.com. >> i mean ohio is a swing state for a reason, is that it resembles the united states, rural areas and suburban areas, you could certainly have a case where romney wins the popular vote by one point and obama wins ohio and iowa by one point that is possible, maybe a one or two-point shift but there is most no way to look at the historof tsounry or try to do the more complex things, the mathematical models unlikely to have romney win the popular and have him lose the electorial college. >> rose: the sites and sounds of hurricane sandy, mark halperin and nate silver when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additi
among women voters just before the election. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news a socl trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the last-minute scuffle for voters: the ground game. early voting. cell phone polls and women voters dominated the final days of the presidential race. a late week "new york times" poll showed the gender gap re-emerge knowledge in president obama's favor. 52% of women and 44% of men support obama. while the g.o.p.'s mitt romney has 44% of women and1% of men in his corner. women voters in battleground states are the coveted demographic according to two campaign experts. >> i think if you look at the president has done with the economy, it is very far reaching, just across the country women have access to capital to start small business, let's not forget his very, very first bill that he signed in to law was lily ledbetter fair pay act. it's a tremendous accomplishment. i think that shows his devotion and his commitment to women. >> first thing you have to ask is, what are women concerned about today, it's jobs, j
. >> this could be the year that digital strategies decide what is shaping up to be a razor-close election, but who is watching us and how much do they know about us? >> ifill: jeffrey brown talks with author bill ivey about his prescription for remaking america's democracy. >> well, i think what we need is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's kqed profiles a photographer who uses google's street view images to create art. >> you have this distinct feeling of decay. the images almost challenge the viewer. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working t solve soci and environment problems at homand oundhe world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation f
to canceled flights, the federal response and potential election impact. we'll have all that and more right here on nbr! >> tom: hurricane sandy is now super-storm sandy as it clashes with another weather system, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurr
.s. jobs data, which will be out on friday, as well as the u.s. presidential election next week. so a lot to watch out for. back to the studio. >> a lot to watch out for indeed, thank you very much. our business reporter at the tokyo stock exchange. >>> that's all for business news for this hour. i'll leave you with a recap of the markets. >>> u.s. president barack obama would be speaking to crowd after crowd in swing states if it hadn't been for the storm. he has less than a week to convince undecided voters. st americans have already examined his record over the past four years. he started his term with a sentiment offered by many of those who came before him. >> that america can change. our union can be perfected. >> many americans have grown tired of what their country had come to represent under george w. bush. obama promised change at home and abroad. he brought an end to the war in iraq. he said u.s. combat forces would pull out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. and he promised to decimate al qaeda. >> after a fire fight they killed osama bin laden and took custody of his body. we
, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa'sopulation, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> intel >> support also comes from carnegie cor
've had a lot of potiveconic news er theast uple of months. is it too close to the election to really make an impact on people's votes? or are people still kind of weighing the economic realities of the country and of the state? >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with author louise erdrich on the crafting of her new novel, dealing with life-altering violence for one native american family. to talk to me. and i knew once i had written into this, when i got to the words, where is your motr i knew that this was the book. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy f 160 ars. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. an by ntritionto yr pbs station
taken a bit of a pause in sandy's aftermath. with the election only a week away, the devastating east coast storm forced both candidates off the stump today. they focused, instead, on disaster relief, with mitt romney in ohio collecting canned foods and bottled water, and the president making a quick afternoon visit to red cross headquarters in washington. >> the most important message i have for them is that america is is with you. we are standing behind you, and we are going to do everything we can to help you get back on your feet. >> ifill: romney also spoke of the need to help storm victims. >> i appreciate your generosity. it's part of the american spirit. the american way to give to people who are in need. and your generosity this morning touches my heart. >> ifill: the romney campaign announced he will resume campaigning tomorrow. the president will remain off the trail through wednesday. he spent most of today at the white house offering federal support to officials in the affected areas. among them, new jersey's republican governor chris christie, a romney supporter who neve
.ncicap.org-- >> all was there. the election this two weeks away, and both candidates are running as if there is no tomorrow. >> this is the first on our 48- hour flight-around campaign marathon extravaganza. we are going to pull an all- nighter. no sleep. >> no question about it, we're seeingore d more enthusiasm, or more support. >> the economy grew at an annual rate of 2%. not great, but better than expected. right here i have a very shaky limb and i will ask you to step out on it. the election were held tomorrow, mark, and who would win? >> i should not go out on any limb, given my weight. barack obama would win based upon the superior effort of the obama campaign a this point and in turning out early voters. >> evan ? >> obama, but we still have a way to go. >> nina? >> i hate doing this, but obama because of the crown them. >> colby? >> national tracking polls has of them close, but the key battleground states, obama still holds a lead. >> what is the ground game, mark? >> the organized effort over months to identify and not only support -- identified not only supporters, bu
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the lon
have been waiting to go to the polls for four years, but only now are parliamentary elections taking place. the eu is watching with some suspicion, especially after the controversial jailing ofhe former prime minister. her political archenemy still leads the country as president. and an increasing number of ukrainians are asking themselves who they can trust that all. one thing is clear -- it is not the political elite. >> it is quite an animated evening. an amateur ensembles stages a comedy about marriage, but it is less about love that about the dowry, money, and influence. just like in ukrainian politics says this journast w inved the actors to come to kiev's old market. the building has long since become a symbol. influential businessme want to privatize it, but these people are protesting those plans. >> more and more people support what we are doing here. many people wonder why we are doing this. when they hear that the building is to be privatized, they all begin helping us, so everyone who has been here becomes part of our movement. >> they have named that project "hospitable
?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. th a couple of dras. at cld be betteroreepi peopleatchg? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between the powerful and the powerless. wall street, global warming, on and on. at most, they made a cameo appearance during the debate. and i think they were trivi
stopping business, travel and the presidential election campaign. people in the u.s. northeast are looking out their windows and seeing the blurry images of a storm that's headed their way. weather experts have downgraded hurricane sandy to a post tropical cycne but it' inging high winds and pelting rain to people up and down the coast. two people are missing after a ship soff of north carolina. several municipalities have declared a state of emergency. the storm is unusually large. it's expected to cut across ne jersey over thxt several hours. electricity.0 houses have lost back obama made a direct appeal to people in the hurricane's path. >> the most important message that i have for the publicight now islease listen t wt your state and local officials are saying. when they tell you to evacuate, you need to evacuate. >> 370,000 new yorkers who live close to the water have already left. city officials have shut down the transit system. businesses and shops have closed. workers are piling up sand bags in front of subway entrances and buildings. >> it's vr important. this is the stop the wa
election day. we get an update. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> we need a president who understands business, and i do. that's why i will be able to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in l
that. >> fancy that. >> these are women who typically voted for president obama in the last election cycle. but are struggling with, we are struggling economically has he upheld his promise and still don't love romney as an option either. we are seeing and talking about the women's issues, they are family issues. these are household issues. they are economic issues. access to healthcare, access to birth control. how many kids we have, those are economic issues. it's going to come down to in so many ways a popularity contest, do i trust the candidate to handle the issues related to the economy. >> i want your thoughts on swing voter waitress mom soccer mom or security mom. you said something about pansy dads, what is all of this talk about abortion affect your swing vote? >> i'm going to agree with what you said, women don't like being talked down to. all of the name calling about women. we were songer moms, and waitress moms the idea of the waitress mom and the definition, working blew collar mom. she has more than one job. so does the husband. what the pollsters have found, they are
, and the election. president obama suspended campaigning to oversee the government's storm response. governor mitt romney canceled campaign events in the key states of virginia and new hampshire. darren gersh tonight looks at the impact with election day one week away. >> reporter: both campaigns say they have stopped fundraising and campaigning in states in sandy's path. governor romney was still looking for votes today in ohio, iowa and wisconsin, but his campaign says he will stay away from the key swing states of virginia and new hampshire to let emergency workers there focus on the storm. both candidates say this is a time for the nation to come together. >> i am not worried at this point about the impact on the election. i'm worried about the impact on families, and i'm worried about the impact on our first responders. i'm worried about the impact on our economy and on transportation. the election will take care of itself next week. >> i would like to ask you who are here today to think about making a contrutioto the red cross or another relief agey, to be of help if you possibly can in any
>> the following is a pbs election 2012 special event. >> tonight frontline, the lives of the men who would be presidt. >> barack obama's a fascinating mixture of boldness and caution. >> when mitt romney gets focused and locked in, watch out. >> stories of family... >> stanley ann dunham was really a thoroughly unconventional mother. >> he had to fend for himself. every step, he was alone. >> the dad stuff just can't be underestimated. >> he had a lot of power to him. he was our hero. >> identity... >> he told his fifth-grade class that his father was an indonesian king. >> he was a white-black kid. >> his extended family is one of the leading mormon families. >> he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. >> controversy... >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> mitt romney doesn't have an ideological bone in his body, as far as i can tell. >> and destiny. >> what unites both of these characters is this sense that there was a place that they were going, a destiny that they had. >> tonight ofrontline, "the choice 2012." >> f
political weekend before the election on tuesday, we talk with john dickerson the political director of cbs news. >>hio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this qstio what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know wh
's devastation should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action. here to talk about the disaster's wide implications are three journalists their coverage of the disaster has called for vigilance in a world facing new and harsh challenges. joining me bryan walsh of "time" magazine. he writes the cover story lessons from the storm. paul barrett assistants managing editor and senior writer of bloomberg busineseek. his cover story is called it's global warming, stupid. and by phone steve coll of the new yorker magazine. i am pleased to have all of them here at this table. steve, this is what you have said. new yorkers like to tell stories about their extraordinary resilience. there's truth in these stories as we've seen in the past few days. the rescue and cooperation devastated communities. the absence of looting the well rehearsed emergency response protocols by many institutions and government. there is a collective sense of denial too about how poorly presented the city is for events of this scale. how poorly prepared have we been, steve? >> well, very, especially about flood waters. ir
in the last few presidential elections, the second highest tally in the country. so, naturally, politics and packers mix. democratic congresswoman tammy baldwin, herself in a tight race for an open senate seat, was here to boost her party's chances. >> we're here at lambeau field, where thousands of people are flocking in to enjoy a great football game. but also just reminding people about their solemn duty to vote, as citizens. and we have a big focus in the final days on getting out the vote. >> reporter: on the other side, republican senator ron johnson had joined up with romney-ryan campaign bus. >> this thing is going to go right down to the wire. i'm cautiously optimistic about it. >> reporter: in fact, barack obama won this state handily in 2008 he was well ahead here this year until the first debate, when mitt romney gained ground. >> when mitt romney led bain, hundreds of plants, factories, and stores were shuttered. workers saw their wages slashed, their jobs sent overseas. >> look at the evidence of the last four years. under the president's policies, middle income americans h
stage in washington, after next week's election. >> tom: tomorrow on "n.b.r." its the nation's financial capital, we look at the challenges and cost of getting new york city moving again. >> susie: all of this is happening on hallowee. that's nightly business report for wednesday, october 31, halloween, have a od and safe evening everyone. >> tom: goodnight susie, we' see you online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
in the economy. after the election, lawmakers have a chance to boost the economy by reaching an agreement to extend expiring tax cuts and ease looming spending cuts; or they can jump off the so-called fiscal cliff and see if the economy follows. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> tom: retail sales moved higher in october as retailers closed their books on the month before sandy rushed ashore. macy's surprised with a better than expected 4% sales gains; kohl's and target also fared well. warehouse store costco was up 5%, while nordstrom was the standout. the high-end retailer posting a near 10% sales gain. >> susie: and auto sales moved higher in october, despite hurricane sandy crimping sales in the final days of the month. sales at g.m. rose almost 5% on strength in its cadillac and buick brands. at ford, sales barely budged, up just four tenths of a percent. the auto maker believes the massive storm cost the industry as many as 25,000 sales in the last three days of the month. chrysler was up 10%, led by its ram pickup truck. toyota's sales were up 16%, while honda gained about half that
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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